Tag Archives: bacteria

The phage from the local lagoon

This post is by MSU postdoc Sarah Doore Earlier this year, I wrote a blog post about doing some hunting with a graduate class here at Michigan State University. I’m not talking about hunting in the traditional sense though, since what … Continue reading

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Uncovering the function of host-associated microbial communities

This post is by MSU grad student Connie Rojas Microbes colonize every surface of their hosts. Once established, they do not live in isolated patches, but instead form highly regulated, structurally and functionally organized communities, termed ‘microbiota’. Due to the … Continue reading

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On Microbial Individuality

This post is written by UI postdoc Jessica Lee I’m writing this blog post in hopes of convincing you to see every microbial cell as a unique individual. It’s a big ask, because microbes are numerous, and even card-carrying microbe lovers have … Continue reading

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Join the conversation: links between communication and cooperation in bacteria

This post is written by UI postdoc Eric Bruger (twitter: @elbruger13) We are used to thinking of ourselves as helpful beings, and humans are comparatively more cooperative in relation to many other species. The ability to cooperate is a major reason humans … Continue reading

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Love is in the air (or maybe it’s just bacteria)

This post is written by BEACON managing director Danielle Whittaker When we fall in love with someone else, is it because they are our soul mates… or is it because we like the way their microbes smell? We think a lot … Continue reading

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Kombucha: More Than Meets the Eye

This post is written by UT Austin undergrad researchers Katelyn Corley, Matthew Hooper, and Zachary Martinez “What starts here changes the world.” This is the motto that we as students at the University of Texas at Austin have come to embrace and strive towards … Continue reading

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How lemur social networks shape microbial transmission

This post is by UT Austin graduate student Amanda Perofsky. Primates exhibit diverse ecological and behavioral patterns, ranging from solitary foragers to several hundred individuals, as in the multi-level societies of hamadryas baboons [1]. Many wild primates live in social … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The Evolution of Cooperation by the Hankshaw Effect: A Big Thumbs Up for Cooperation!

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Washington graduate students Katie Dickinson and Sarah Hammarlund and postdoc Brian Connelly. Hold your hand out in front of you and examine it closely. Five digits, four fingers … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The Social Lives of Bacteria

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU faculty member Chris Waters. “Nature red in tooth and claw”-Lord Alfred Tennyson Tennyson’s famous phrase eloquently describes the adversarial nature (pun intended) that arises from Darwin’s concepts of natural … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: What ice cream and biofuels have in common: vanillin and the microbes that eat it

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Idaho postdoc Jessica Audrey Lee. Greetings, BEACON fans. I’m writing from beautiful Moscow, ID, where I work as a postdoctoral researcher in the Marx Lab at the University … Continue reading

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