Tag Archives: Biological Evolution

In the Light of Evolution: Connecting Genotype to Phenotype and Fitness in an Introductory Biology Class

This post is by UW research scientist Katie Dickinson “It was through the [Bio180 CURE] class that biology truly came to life and I felt that our time in [the] lab was interesting and relevant to our world today. The large … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Education | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on In the Light of Evolution: Connecting Genotype to Phenotype and Fitness in an Introductory Biology Class

Exploring the evolution of troglodytes?

This post is by MSU postdoc John Phillips Some of you may be familiar with the term ‘troglodyte’, which is a somewhat old-timey derogatory term for an unintelligent person. The Greek root troglo- means “cave” so a troglodyte is a cave … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Notes from the Field | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Exploring the evolution of troglodytes?

Feral chickens are a-changing: updates on the rapid evolution of Kauai’s hybrid Gallus gallus

This post is by MSU research associate Eben Gering. After an hour of trying to trap chickens at Hanalei Beach Park, we had only caught odd looks from locals. Finally, one bold rooster approached our buried net, cautiously tapped the spring-loaded … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Notes from the Field | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Feral chickens are a-changing: updates on the rapid evolution of Kauai’s hybrid Gallus gallus

Can birdsong signal immune gene quality?

This post is by MSU postdoc Joel Slade.  “BEEP! BEEP! BEEP!” – I wake up to the dreaded sound of my alarm clock at 3:45 am in my cabin. Even though it’s mid-April at the Queen’s University Biological Station in Elgin … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Notes from the Field | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Can birdsong signal immune gene quality?

A Tail of Two Ascidians

This post is written by UW grad student Alexander Fodor Searching through the lower intertidal and subtidal rocky beaches you notice a small strange creature attached to the underside of a rock in a small pool of water. It has a round … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on A Tail of Two Ascidians

Beneficial bacteria in Oz

This post is by MSU grad student Colleen Friel Increasing agricultural sustainability is an important research focus in the face of climate change, rapid population increase, and growing food insecurity. Synthetic nitrogen fertilizers have fueled a huge boom in agricultural productivity … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Notes from the Field | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Beneficial bacteria in Oz

Amoeba hugs are often deadly, and sometimes they set your career

This post is written by NCAT faculty Misty Thomas My passion for Microbiology first started when I was in my undergraduate microbiology class at the Collège Universitaire de St. Boniface, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. I’m sure it was a cold … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Education | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Amoeba hugs are often deadly, and sometimes they set your career

The evolution of code is like the evolution of DNA nanotechnology

This post is written by UI faculty Peter Allen I’m Peter Allen, a professor of Chemistry at the University of Idaho. I use DNA nanotechnology to build tiny things like autonomous nanomachines. DNA is more than genes and heredity. When I tell … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on The evolution of code is like the evolution of DNA nanotechnology

Teeny tiny creepy crawlies: the phage in your backyard

This post is written by MSU postdoc Sarah Doore When I was little, my dad would often take me around the backyard to hunt for bugs. Spiders—which are not bugs, but little me didn’t care about taxonomy at the time—were my … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, Education | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Teeny tiny creepy crawlies: the phage in your backyard

Individual and Population Variation Pop-Up Institute at UT Austin

This post is written by UT Austin grad student Rayna Harris and postdoc Tessa Solomon-Lane Innovative science is increasingly interdisciplinary. With our Pop-Up Institute in May 2017, we aim to expand beyond the traditional scope of interdisciplinary collaboration to make meaningful … Continue reading

Posted in BEACON Researchers at Work, BEACONites, Member Announcements | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Individual and Population Variation Pop-Up Institute at UT Austin