Tag Archives: Field Biology

The phage from the local lagoon

This post is by MSU postdoc Sarah Doore Earlier this year, I wrote a blog post about doing some hunting with a graduate class here at Michigan State University. I’m not talking about hunting in the traditional sense though, since what … Continue reading

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Uncovering the function of host-associated microbial communities

This post is by MSU grad student Connie Rojas Microbes colonize every surface of their hosts. Once established, they do not live in isolated patches, but instead form highly regulated, structurally and functionally organized communities, termed ‘microbiota’. Due to the … Continue reading

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Beneficial bacteria in Oz

This post is by MSU grad student Colleen Friel Increasing agricultural sustainability is an important research focus in the face of climate change, rapid population increase, and growing food insecurity. Synthetic nitrogen fertilizers have fueled a huge boom in agricultural productivity … Continue reading

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Smells like Mean Sprit

This post is written by BEACON’s own managing director Danielle Whittaker about her work that has been accepted pending minor revisions in a special issue of Journal of Comparative Physiology A.  Fighting is risky – at best, it uses up energy … Continue reading

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Africa’s next top animal intelligence model

This post is written by MSU grad student Lily Johnson-Ulrich Spotted hyenas are found in just about every habitat in sub-Saharan Africa including human-disturbed areas and fully urbanized ones (i.e., cities) (Yirga Abay, Bauer, Gebrihiwot, & Deckers, 2010). While most large carnivores … Continue reading

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Teeny tiny creepy crawlies: the phage in your backyard

This post is written by MSU postdoc Sarah Doore When I was little, my dad would often take me around the backyard to hunt for bugs. Spiders—which are not bugs, but little me didn’t care about taxonomy at the time—were my … Continue reading

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Big things happen in small rodents: grasshopper mice as a model for the evolution of pain resistance

This post is written by MSU grad student Lauren Koenig Life in the desert is full of extremes. Daytime temperatures are scorching, monsoon rains are torrential, and plants are sparse and spiky. Yet many desert animals, such as grasshopper mice (Onychomys torridus) … Continue reading

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Love is in the air (or maybe it’s just bacteria)

This post is written by BEACON managing director Danielle Whittaker When we fall in love with someone else, is it because they are our soul mates… or is it because we like the way their microbes smell? We think a lot … Continue reading

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Better Together: Of Hyenas and Men

This post is written by MSU grad student Zachary M. Laubach “A guy needs somebody―to be near him. A guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody. Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you. I … Continue reading

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Can evolution help us rebuild native habitats?

This post is by MSU graduate student Anna Groves. If you look at the lyrics of two of the most iconic songs in American history, you’ll find that both reveal the composers’ fondness for the wide open spaces of our … Continue reading

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