Tag Archives: plant biology

BEACON Researchers at Work: Genetic and Environmental Basis of Trait Loss, or, How to Lose a Trait: Organismal Spring Cleaning Edition

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Samuel Perez. The study of morphological traits, physical features that are directly observable and measurable, is important for the study of evolution, and play a central role … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The role of resource mutualisms in plant adaptation to abiotic environments

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Tomomi Suwa.  When you get thirsty, what do you do? You simply get something to drink, right? Plants don’t have the ability to move like animals, so … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: What makes invasive species successful?

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Amanda Charbonneau. I love to walk through the woods on a quiet quest to see how many woodland creatures I can spot, and to take an inventory … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The mystery of tropical diversity: testing a forgotten idea

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work post is by MSU graduate student Carina Baskett. Carina blogs at Wandering Nature. Here in Michigan, the hummingbirds are coming back for the summer. If you see one, it’s likely a Ruby-Throated, since it’s … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Patterns and processes of community assembly of plants in oceanic and alpine island ecosystems

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Idaho graduate student Hannah Marx. “I love my job.” – written by me, at 12,009 feet in the summit log on Hyndman Peak, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho. Although I … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Measuring natural selection in flowers

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work post is by MSU graduate student Raffica La Rosa.  Novel traits differ qualitatively from the characters from which they arise, and are generally thought to be adaptive. I study adaptive novel traits by combining … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Mating System Evolution

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by Michigan State University postdoc Sarah Bodbyl. “Bees do have a smell, you know, and if they don’t they should, for their feet are dusted with spices from a million flowers.” ― Ray … Continue reading

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